City Master Plan

 Camden County Joint Comprehensive Plan Update

The cities of Kingsland, St. Marys and Woodbine, are working in cooperation with the Camden County and staff of the Coastal Regional Commission to update the Camden County Joint Comprehensive Plan, as required by the Georgia Department of Community Affairs. Public Meetings are held monthly and all are welcome to attend. Please contact your local planning office for details.

2007-2027 Joint Camden Comprehensive Plan
Georgia Department of Community Affairs website of Current Georgia Comprehensive Plans

The Next Camden County Joint Comprehensive Plan Meeting will be held Thursday, August 24th, at the Kingsland North Center
531 N. Lee St., Kingsland, GA, from Noon to 2:00 PM. The meeing is open to the public and all are welcome to attend.

August 24th Agenda

170519.Resiliency&GrowthBanner

As the Joint Comprehensive Plan Update continues, representatives from Camden
County, Kingland, St. Marys and Woodbine held a Workshop, May 19th, to
discuss the project timeline, goals and possible impacts. In light of
the recent St. Marys Sea Rise Study, representatives worked at the
table-level to discuss future growth and the constraints impacting that
growth. Lupita McClenning, of the Coastal Regional Commission was on
hand to lead a discussion on the Joint Comprehensive Plan Stakeholder
work sessions and a review of the feedback already garnered from those
sessions. Maps from the various jurisdictions can be found below along
with the presentation materials. 
Materials:
Joint Comprehensive Plan & Resiliency Workshop Presentation, Adams
Growth Trends & Population Projections for Camden County, Kessler
Joint Comprehensive Plan Kick-Off Packet
Constraints & Growth Map of Camden County
Constraints & Growth Map of Kingsland
Constraints & Growth Map of St. Marys
Constraints & Growth Map of Woodbine

 
Draft Camden County Technical Data

Synopsis of the Findings from the Technical Appendix Report and Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis for each jurisdiction:

Here is a synopsis of the findings from the Technical Appendix Report and the SWOT Analysis as it relates to the Camden County Comp Plan:
  1. Steady growth—It appears that the growth was explosive from 2000-2010.  For example, Kingsland’s growth percentage was 51.8% and St. Mary’s growth percentage was 24.4% from 2000-2010. The growth has continued from 2010-present but at a much slower pace.
  2. Increasing Median Age-The data indicates that the median age is increasing for the community.
  3. Significant Retirement Age Community—The data notes that the retirement age community needs should be considered.
  4. Children—The needs of children should be considered as part of the comprehensive planning process.  The data notes that the number of school age children is larger than the number of retirement age citizens.
  5. Increasing Diversity-The data notes increasing diversity within the community.
  6. Jobs/Opportunities—The data notes the importance of bringing in jobs that would retain and attract college graduates.  The data suggests opportunities that would attract young families would be beneficial for the community as well.
  7. Large Educated Retirement Age Community—The data indicates that there is a significant retirement age community, particularly in St. Marys.  The well-educated population serves as a significant resource to the community. In addition, their knowledge and experiences are assets to the area.

In regard to SWOT, the following additions are recommended:

Camden County

Preserve: Quality School System

St. Marys

No changes or additions. 

Kingsland

Preserve: Quality School System

Eliminate: Blight (Downtown Corridor-US Highway 17)

Woodbine:

Woodbine’s SWOT was not discussed in depth at previous meetings this year.  However, Woodbine’s SWOT from July 2015 that was incorporated into their comp plan update includes the following:

Achieve (Do you want it? Yes. Do you have it? No)

• Complete Streets (methodology and principle that has now been mandated for new

capital improvement/infrastructure that is being expanded has to include multi-accessible

- making room for not only automobiles, but also pedestrians and cyclists).

• Accessible boat ramp

• Expanding dock/Marina (for transient boat access so people can be brought to

Woodbine by boat and be able to get to rest of City)

• Connect Waterfront to City (even though the PSA has just invested more than $20,000 in

the park, additional improvements are needed such as pavilion screens).

• Screened pavilions (have bare minimum pavilions now and in summer, especially, need

screens)

• Educational signage for plants, bio-diversity along Boardwalk (telling people about the

plants they are looking at; environmental preservation)

• Boost amenities

• Marketing Woodbine assets

• Using river as economic driver (kayak tours, restaurants, etc. to pull people off Interstate

to Woodbine)

• Set up a water trail

• Market Satilla River (Woodbine is major last stop on Satilla River)

• Design Guidelines (nothing has been formerly adopted)

• Network connectivity parks

• Eco-friendly

• Downtown

Preserve (Do you want it? Yes. Do you have it? Yes)

• Sense of community

Natural assets (beauty, plants, etc.)

• Financial stability (has been stable for many years; small city – overhead costs not much;

never had to borrow; no huge pension obligations)

• Aesthetic quality of city

• Woodbine River Walk

• Historic quality of Woodbine (sizable nice parks; nice old houses)

• Music/Opry

Avoid (Do you want it? No. Do you have it? No.)

• Spur looking like Hwy. 40 (aesthetics)

• Unplanned growth

• Losing traditional downtown Woodbine

• Big Box (if Spaceport comes and Exit 14 traffic increases, a Walmart may come in and

Woodbine would be a ghost town)

Avoid (Do you want it? No. Do you have it? No.)

• Spur looking like Hwy. 40 (aesthetics)

• Unplanned growth

• Losing traditional downtown Woodbine

• Big Box (if Spaceport comes and Exit 14 traffic increases, a Walmart may come in and

Woodbine would be a ghost town)

Eliminate (Do you want it? No. Do you have it? Yes)

• Uninviting waterfront entrance

• Blight (abandoned houses, for example)

March 7, 2017 Kick-off Meeting

The initial meeting of the Joint Comprehensive Plan was held in Kingsland, where representatives from each jurisdiction gathered to develop a timeline and review objectives. A summary of that meeting can be found here:
March 7, 2017 Kick-off Meeting Summary


One St. Marys Master Plan Materials Available

 

One St. Marys City Master Plan approved by Planning Commission, before the City Council, Monday, July 3rd


 

The Planning Commission will review the One St. Marys Master Plan on Tuesday evening, June 20th, at 5:30 PM.  On May 4th, 2017, the Master Plan Steering Committee(MPSC) approved the Master Plan, which will be heard by the Planning Commission and forwarded to the City Council for their consideration. The One St. Marys Master Plan consists of the Document, Maps, Community Work Program by Subject and by Priority, the Data Assessment, the Community Engagement Plan, the Transportation Plan, and the St. Marys Flood Resiliency Report. The Meeting Agenda, Staff Report, and Master Plan Summary, by Mike Rich, the Chair of the MPSC, are also available for review.

 

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact the Community Development Department or come to the meeting Monday night and have your say.

Joint Comprehensive Plan Workshop

As the Joint Comprehensive Plan Update begins, representatives from Camden County, Kingland, St. Marys and Woodbine held a Workshop last week to discuss the project timeline, goals and possible impacts. In light of the recent St. Marys Sea Rise Study, representatives worked at the table-level to discuss future growth and the constraints impacting that growth. Lupita McClenning, of the Coastal Regional Commission was on hand to lead a discussion on the Joint Comprehensive Plan Stakeholder work sessions and a review of the feedback already garnered from those sessions. Maps from the various jurisdictions can be found below along with the presentation materials. You can stay engaged in the Joint Comprehensive Plan Project by following the onestmarys.com posts or connect with the Community Development happenings on our Facebook feed.

Materials:
Joint Comprehensive Plan & Resiliency Workshop Presentation, Adams
Growth Trends & Population Projections for Camden County, Kessler
Joint Comprehensive Plan Kick-Off Packet
Constraints & Growth Map of Camden County
Constraints & Growth Map of Kingsland
Constraints & Growth Map of St. Marys
Constraints & Growth Map of Woodbine


St. Marys Sea Rise Report

Dr. Jason Evans and many of the authors and researchers that were part of the St. Marys Flood Resiliency Project were in town to present their findings from a three year study on the rising risks of flooding associated with sea rise, before the St. Marys City Council. The project has been a collaboration of the City, with Georgia Sea Grant, Stetson University and North Carolina Sea Grant, and began with a series of stakeholder interviews, town hall public meetings and facilitated discussion sessions to form the heart of an innovative Vulnerability, Consequences and Adaptation Planning Scenarios(VCAPS) structural modeling approach. Results from the VCAPS process were then used to inform a series of custom geo-spatial vulnerability assessments that analyzed current and future flood risks to property and infrastructure under different sea-level rise scenarios.  The Final Report, detailing the finding and recommendations, from the technical sea-rise projections to the Community Rating System work, can be found below.

Materials:
St. Marys Sea Rise Final Report

Downtown Form-Based Code Workshop


The Downtown area, that area just north and south of the rail-road tracks, down to the waterfront, is being proposed as an area that will function under a Form-Based Code. The area will be divided into sub-districts that will emphasize the forms, more than the uses of the buildings. The presentation, proposed DRAFT map of the Downtown Districts, and Article 5, from Beaufort, South Carolina’s Form-Based Code, can be found below. The Beaufort Code is provided as an example of how Form-Based Code functions, in a similar setting and can provided St. Marys a framework for discussion.

Materials:
Downtown Form-Based Code Workshop Presentation
Proposed DRAFT Downtown Form-Based District Map

Beaufort, SC, Article 5 Supplement to Zones Example


Zoning Changes Workshop